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What is Purim?

Jewish-Children-and-Families - Mon, 02/19/2018 - 12:00am
From bimbam.com


From the parties to the reading of the Megillah to the piles and piles of Hamentashen, Purim is easily the most fun holiday in the Jewish calendar. This series of videos talks about all of the great traditions, the basics, the story, the graggers (including a video on making your own). Check them out!

Click here.

 

Want more information on Purim? Check out Jvillage Network's Purim Guide. 

Saving lives in the ICU through artificial intelligence

Israeli-News - Mon, 02/19/2018 - 12:00am

Photo from Shutterstock

 

By Brian Blum for Israel21c


An Israeli venture capitalist’s personal tragedy brought him to a startup seeking to provide immediate health updates for fragile patients.

 

Two years ago, Gal Salomon’s mother developed sepsis during a stay in the hospital. “It was a big hospital with a lot of patients and no one saw or understood it was happening,” Salomon recalls bitterly. “We lost her after two days.”

Continue reading.

How is “Interfaith Purim” Different From All Other Purims? It Isn’t.

Interfaith-Issues - Mon, 02/19/2018 - 12:00am
BY SUSAN KATZ MILLER from On Being Both


Purim begins the evening of February 28

 

For interfaith families sharing Judaism and Christianity, spring is busy with holidays. From Christianity, we have Mardi Gras, Lent, Easter. From Judaism, we have Purim, Passover and Shavuot. When I tell folks we are celebrating any of these holidays with our independent interfaith community, I often get questions like, “How is interfaith Purim different from regular (Jewish) Purim?”

And the answer is: it isn’t, at least not in terms of the celebration, the rituals, the liturgy. The point of our interfaith community is not to change the traditions, or merge them, or create a third religion. Rather, the intent is to give our children the deepest experience of these rituals we possibly can, while remaining radically inclusive of who gets to participate, and how.

Continue reading.

 

Want more? Check out Jvillage Network's Purim Board on Pinterest. 

Want even more information on Purim? Check out Jvillage Network's Purim Guide. 

 

 

Is man-made pollution making storms more severe?

Green-Living - Mon, 02/19/2018 - 12:00am
by Jaime Bender for FromtheGrapevine


Research shows that even the smallest of man-made particles can intensify thunderstorms, which can lead to soil erosion, runoff and damaged crops.


In case you're still wondering what kind of impact something as commonplace as your car's exhaust is having on the environment ... wonder no more.

A new study from an international team of researchers – including Dr. Jiwen Fan at the U.S. Department of Energy and Professor Daniel Rosenfeld of the Institute of Earth Sciences at Hebrew University in Jerusalem, Israel – found that even the smallest particles from man-made emissions can fuel severe storms and influence weather. That, in turn, can wreak serious havoc on crops and agriculture.

Continue reading.

A STEPPING STONE TO INDEPENDENT, HEALTHY, ADULTHOOD

Young-Adults - Mon, 02/19/2018 - 12:00am
bamidbartherapy.org


BaMidbar Wilderness Therapy is a wilderness-based recovery and treatment program for Jewish young adults.


Mission

BaMidbar Wilderness Therapy guides Jewish young adults on individualized journeys of self-discovery and healing.  Through nature-based therapy, BaMidbar is a stepping stone to independent, healthy, adulthood.

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Remembering Amalek

Celebrating-Shabbat - Mon, 02/19/2018 - 12:00am
BY RABBI IRVING GREENBERG for myjewishlearning.com 


A serious lesson that focuses on fighting evil precedes the Purim festivities.


Purim opens on a somber note. Haman is identified as the descendant of Amalek, whose people attacked Israel in the desert, the symbol of cruelty to the weak. Before celebrating the defeat of the wicked, one must remember that God (as well as God’s people) has a war with the Amalekites and will not be at ease until the Amalekites are blotted out. Jews are pledged to work for the end of oppression of the weak everywhere; a temporary, partial victory should not blind one to the persistence of evil in the world.

 

Continue reading.

 

Want more information on Purim? Check out Jvillage Network's Purim Guide. 

Creating Spaces for Queer, Jewish Families

LGBTQ - Mon, 02/19/2018 - 12:00am
BY JAIME BRODY for myjewishlearning.com 


Reflections from Keshet's families with young children coordinator.


Nearly a year and a half ago, my family of four attended a local Jewish community Rosh Hashanah event. There were other young families there, and my 3-year-old had a blast petting chickens, sampling different flavors of honey, and forgetting about her pesky newborn brother for a few minutes. As is often the case at events like this, my wife and I could clearly see we were the only queer family in attendance.

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Brazilian-Jewish pioneers to New York celebrated in Rio Carnival parade

News-in-the-Jewish-World - Mon, 02/19/2018 - 12:00am
By Marcus M. Gilban for JTA


RIO DE JANEIRO (JTA) — The saga of the European Jewish refugees who established the first synagogue in the New World and eventually also North America’s first congregation was celebrated in Rio’s Carnival parade.

A group of 80 Jewish community members joined more than 3,000 of Portela samba school performers on Monday night as they paraded along the half-mile street telling the bold story of the Jews expelled from Portugal, their temporary religious freedom and prosperity in a Dutch-ruled Brazilian region, and their second expulsion leading them to found the Shearith Israel synagogue in New York.

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Israeli chefs take hamantaschen to a whole new level

Jewish-Food - Mon, 02/19/2018 - 12:00am
By Andrew Tobin for JTA


Cheesecake, amaretto or goat cheese and onion jam?

Those are just some of the new hamantaschen options this year at Roladin, a popular Israeli bakery chain. On Tuesday, the Dizengoff Center branch in Tel Aviv, one of dozens around the country, was bustling in advance of the Purim holiday, which starts next Wednesday evening.

 

Continue reading.

 

Want more information on Purim? Check out Jvillage Network's Purim Guide. 

 

Jewish Books to Look Forward to in 2018

Jewish-Books - Mon, 02/19/2018 - 12:00am
From Jewish Book Council


It's time to compile our reading lists for the year ahead. There are so many amazing Jewish-interest books coming out in 2018...We have a lot of reading to do! Here's just a small selection of forthcoming releases that we're particularly excited about.


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Looking Beyond Purim and the Megilla

Celebrating-Judaism - Mon, 02/19/2018 - 12:00am
By Peretz Goldstein for JPULSE in JewishBoston.com


Purim Begins the Evening of February 28, 2018


Have you ever wondered why Purim comes before Pesach?

 


Exactly 30 days after Purim, we celebrate the holiday of Pesach. Our Sages tell us that this is no coincidence. The juxtaposition of these two holidays is the theme of redemption; being saved. “Masmich geula le’geula” – connecting salvation to salvation.

The comparison of Pesach and Purim is clear. What we celebrate at Pesach time is another instance in Jewish history where the Jews were under extreme persecution, threatened to be wiped out, and were saved at the end of the day (that’s why we have a party and drink some le’chaims at the Seder night too!).

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Want more information on Purim? Check out Jvillage Network's Purim Guide. 

He Fought Polar Bears And Nazis And Was Called ‘The Most Unique Jew Alive’

Featured-Articles - Mon, 02/19/2018 - 12:00am
Talya Zax for The Forward

 


On December 20, 1934, the New York Jewish Daily Bulletin’s Michel Kraike published an article about one Peter Freuchen: “Eight feet tall, weighing close to 330 pounds, with a head like a grizzly bear’s and a thick, square red beard.”

Born in Denmark, Freuchen held a series of professions that, to modern ears, might sound unlikely: He was an Arctic explorer who traded goods with the Eskimos, a novelist who accidentally starred in a Hollywood adaptation of his book “Eskimo,” an amateur-surgeon-by-necessity — suffering from frostbite during his time with the Eskimos, he amputated several of his own toes before eventually having his leg amputated — and a onetime governor of a Greenland colony.

Read more.

TETZAVEH - SHABBAT ZACHOR

Weekly-Torah-Portion - Mon, 02/19/2018 - 12:00am

Exodus 27:20 - 30:10; Maftir:  Deuteronomy 25:17-19 

 

By: Reb Mimi Feigelson, Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies 


The Shabbat before Purim is most famous for its name - Shabbat Zachor - the Shabbat of remembering. A month before Nissan we begin to read four additional Torah sections to prepare us for Pesach and all that the festival entails (yes, once Purim is over, Pesach cleaning begins...). Till this day, even though we no longer observe the laws of ritual holiness, we still read the section regarding the red heifer in two weeks time. But this coming Shabbat stands out in its proximity to Purim - Shabbat Zachor will always be the Shabbat prior to Purim.

Tradition teaches us that Haman was an offspring of Amalek, and therefore, we are asked to remember - Zachor - that there is an ongoing force that pursues and challenges us as we journey through life.

Continue reading.

A Purim Treat That’s Fit for a Queen

Jewish-Food - Mon, 02/12/2018 - 12:00am
By Joan Nathan for Tablet Magazine  


Purim begins the evening of February 28

 

Every year at Purim we look forward to eating sweet triangular pastries called hamantaschen, but the first recipe I could find for cookies we might recognize as hamantaschen—filled with poppy seeds—appeared in Aunt Babette’s Cookbook of 1889. So what did American Jews eat on Purim before then? Purim fritters, also known as Queen Esther’s toast.

A recipe for Purim fritters appears in Jennie June’s Cookbook of 1866, and it was copied as Queen Esther’s toast in the National Cookery Book 10 years later, celebrating the Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia. It was made from the inside of a stale roll or loaf of bread, with the crust removed, soaked in eggs and milk; it was then fried in butter and served with cinnamon, a sugar syrup, honey, or “hundreds and thousands”—essentially, jimmies or sprinkles.

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Want more information on Purim? Check out Jvillage Network's Purim Guide. 

Author Talk: Rose Tremain

Jewish-Books - Mon, 02/12/2018 - 12:00am
By Joanne Sydney Lessner for Hadassah Magazine


The Gustav Sonata, winner of Hadassah Magazine’s Harold U. Ribalow Award as well as a National Jewish Book Award, is the first of Rose Tremain’s 14 novels to address a Jewish theme. Tremain, 74, who lives in Norfolk, England, often writes about social groups slightly out of the prevailing mainstream. Her Orange Prize-winner The Road Home concerns an Eastern European immigrant trying to make a life in England. The Gustav Sonata, set in Switzerland before, during and after World War II, traces the lifelong friendship between exuberant, ambitious (and Jewish) Anton and reserved, empathetic Gustav (who is not). While exploring the evolution of their relationship and the family circumstances that shape them, Tremain turns her delicately penetrating prose to themes of unspoken love, loyalty, music and the sacrifices made in pursuit of neutrality.

What was your inspiration for The Gustav Sonata?

Continue reading.

Your Guide to Reading the Hebrew Bible

Celebrating-Judaism - Mon, 02/12/2018 - 12:00am
myjewishlearning.com Staff


Learn the many chapters that make up the Tanach and find out where you can find more information about each.


Have you always wanted to read the Bible, but didn’t know how to get started?

In addition to the myriad editions of the Hebrew Bible (also known as the Tanach ) available in book form, the entire Bible can be read in Hebrew and English on Sefaria, an online resource that enables users to search by keyword and provides links to commentaries and other related materials. Below, we outline the contents of the Bible, with links to our articles about each section.

Continue reading.

How to Make Savory Hamantaschen, Six Ways

Jewish-Children-and-Families - Mon, 02/12/2018 - 12:00am
BY SAMANTHA FERRARO for The Nosher for myjewishlearning.com 


Purim Begins the Evening of February 28, 2018


Purim is all about the party, the fun and the celebrating. Get in the spirit this year and host a build-your-own hamantaschen party! Not everyone wants sweet treats these days, so why not make them savory?

 

Continue reading.

Want more information on Purim? Check out Jvillage Network's Purim Guide. 

 

The 3 big breakthroughs coming to digital health in 2018

Israeli-News - Mon, 02/12/2018 - 12:00am
By Abigail Klein Leichman for Israel21c


Israel is pioneering digital health developments for the world. Which ones will hit their stride in the coming months?


Medication personalization, personalized disease management and reducing chronic pain will be the three biggest breakthroughs in digital health this year, predicts Dr. Yossi Bahagon, a family physician, global digital health consultant and managing partner of OurCrowd Qure, Israel’s first exclusively focused digital health fund.


Continue reading.
 

Purim

Interfaith-Issues - Mon, 02/12/2018 - 12:00am
This article has been reprinted with permission from InterfaithFamily 

 

Purim Begins the Evening of February 28, 2018



Purim is a Jewish Halloween, a Jewish Mardi Gras and a secular New Year rolled into one. And it is not just a holiday for children who know immediately that anything with a costume will be fun. All Jews are commanded to be silly and celebrate the ancient victory against their adversaries by giving gifts of food to friends and to the poor.

Purim comes in the late winter or early spring. Jews have celebrated by dressing up as both the heroes and villains of the Purim story, as they chase away their winter doldrums and acknowledge that Purim brings springtime.

Continue reading.

Want more? Check out Jvillage Network's Purim Board on Pinterest. 

Want even more information on Purim? Check out Jvillage Network's Purim Guide. 

Pollution’s impact on weather, crops worse than once thought

Green-Living - Mon, 02/12/2018 - 12:00am
By ISRAEL21c Staff



New multinational research reveals that even small amounts of manmade aerosol particles can wreak havoc.


Even the tiniest of particles from human emissions can fuel powerful storms and influence weather and crops much more than previously thought, according to new research published January 26 in the journal Science.


The study focuses on the power of manmade aerosol emissions to grow rain clouds and intensify storms. These particles come from urban and industrial air pollution, wildfires and other sources.


Continue reading.
 

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Daily Morning Minyan
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DHJC would love to keep in touch with your college student while they are away at school. Sisterhood would like to include your college student in our Collegiate Outreach Program. As a member of DHJC, your undergraduate college student(s) are entitled to receive various mailings and good wishes, all geared to the Jewish lifestyle and calendar.

Please fill out the form and email to Sheryl Gerber or bring to Ellen in the office.

 

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The PIC Program provides Counseling, Education, Case Management and Volunteer Coordination through the gateways of our synagogue partners

Dix Hills Jewish Center

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Temple Isaiah

Michele Herman, LMSW

PIC Coordinator 631-462-9800x239

[email protected]


For More Info

Welcome to the Dix Hills Jewish Center

Welcome to the Dix Hills Jewish Center, a Conservative Congregation, celebrating 50 years as a beacon of dynamic Judaism in Dix Hills. We are a traditional egalitarian synagogue committed to the reality that all Jews are full partners in the beauty of Jewish life and that all Jews are given an equal role in all rituals. The Dix Hills Jewish Center is an engaging, vibrant congregation. We are excited about the growth in our synagogue, and the wonderful growth of the Jewish community of Dix Hills, Commack and the neighboring communities. We are a community committed to learning, to supporting each other, and to being a warm and welcoming place for all who participate. Welcome to the Dix Hills Jewish Center.

Service & Minyan times located at the bottom of the page.

If you are interested in attending any of our programs please check the Calendar in Upcoming Events. Children's programming is also available.


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Simchas

For joyous occassions in your life, please share your naches with the Rabbi. Inform the Rabbi about births, engagements, weddings and other noteworthy moments in the life of your family. The Rabbi will arrange for baby namings, provide information regarding a mohel ( for infant boys), coordinate a pidyon ha-ben (the redemption ceremony for firstborn males), schedule an aufruf (to celebrate a forthcoming marriage), weddings and bring the richness of Jewish traditions and mitzvoth into your simcha(email rabbi or call 631-499-6644).

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In case of illness and/or hospitalization, please notify the Rabbi at 631-499-6644 (24/6 - on Shabbat, see below for further emergency instructions)

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Even before making funeral arrangements notify Rabbi Buechler at the synagogue office at 631-499-6644 (after office hours press #3 for the emergency numbers). Rabbi Buechler will assist and guide you in making the appropriate arrangements for the funeral. In the event that you cannot reach the Rabbi, contact the Jewish funeral home and begin to make your arrangements. PLEASE, if Rabbi Buechler is going to officiate at the funeral, do not finalize the funeral time until the Rabbi has contacted you. At most this will be a few hours. In the event that Rabbi Buechler is on vacation, Cantor Hevenstone is available and other local Conservative Rabbis are on call. Their names can be obtained by calling the synagogue office, an officer of the synagogue or the Ritual Chairman. It is also appropriate to contact Rabbi Buechler whenever tragedy or trauma occurs. On Shabbat and Yomtov the Rabbi does not use the telephone. Therefore, you can convey information to him on these days at the synagogue during scheduled service times, by calling him immediately after Shabbat or Yomtov or by going to his residence.


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Do you have a relative or friend in our congregation who would benefit from a personal home visit? We are here for you! Members of our DHJC Social Action Committee - Tender Loving Congregants -- will happily come to visit and chat. BIKUR CHOLIM -- we visit our friends and relatives in Gurwin. Become a volunteer. Learn how.

High School students -- learn how to be a volunteer at Gurwin! There are many ways to volunteer.

Please contact us [email protected]


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Whether you are 20 or 120, or anything in between, we would like to honor you on the anniversary of your bar or bat mitzvah. Please send the date of your bar/bat mitzvah or the name of your parsha to Lee Grebstein [email protected]


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