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25 Roast Chicken Recipes for Friday Night

Jewish-Food - 18 hours 1 min ago
BY THE NOSHER for MyJewishLearning.com


So many recipes, you will never get bored with Friday roast chicken.


Having chicken on Friday night is an ingrained tradition for Eastern European families. Good roasted chicken doesn’t require many ingredients, and it feeds a crowd, making it an obvious choice. And back in Eastern Europe, red meat was expensive and not as readily accessible; it was generally reserved for more special occasions like holidays. Food writer and cookbook author Ronnie Fein shares, “Shabbat was one of the few times the Jews, who were poor, could indulge in chicken. The rest of the week would be potatoes, vegetables and grains.”

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A Different Vision of a Jewish Homeland

Jewish-Books - 18 hours 1 min ago
By Adam Dickter for Hadassah Magazine

Isra Isle: A Novel By Nava Semel. Translated by Jessica Cohen


In the course of modern Jewish history, there were several visions for a Jewish national home other than Theodor Herzl’s dream of Israel in historic biblical land. In the early 1900s, for example, in response to pogroms in Russia, the British proposed annexing a slice of Uganda for the Jews—a nonstarter. Even more absurd was Mordechai Manuel Noah’s concept of a Jewish homeland as “Ararat City,” to be located in the gray mist of Niagara Falls, where he had purchased Grand Island, poised between the United States and Canadian borders. Noah (1785 to 1851) was an influential American diplomat and journalist, but, ultimately, he couldn’t rally much enthusiasm for an “Isra Isle” while world Jewry dreamed of a return to Jerusalem. (Michael Chabon envisioned another alternate home for Jews in Sitka, Alaska, in his book The Yiddish Policemen’s Union.)

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Why I’ve Decided to Join a Synagogue

Celebrating-Judaism - 18 hours 1 min ago
BY SOFI HERSHER for ReformJudaism.org


When I was 9 years old, I watched several large sections of my synagogue burn to the ground. It was 1999, and Sacramento, California, was in the midst of a spree of white supremacist violence that would claim the lives of two gay men, and see fires set to several synagogues and a local abortion clinic. I can still smell the smoke.

In times such as these, it is not just buildings that are damaged. Acts of hate damage our minds and our bodies, our individual and collective sense of security, our identity, and our place in the world. Back then, the entire congregation, as well as large swaths of the greater community, came together to rebuild. Events were held to reject discrimination; a hate crimes task force was launched; a library was remade. In many ways, Sacramento became a better place to live than it was before. In the aftermath of destruction, came collaboration and solidarity and hope.

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Top 10 Jewish Words to Teach Your Kids

Jewish-Children-and-Families - 18 hours 1 min ago
BY AMY DEUTSCH for Kveller


I love the way certain phrases, sounds, and words add up to a special family vocabulary. I’m pretty sure my kids think I don’t know the word “head” because I only ever call it by the Yiddish word keppe (especially when I’m giving it a kiss!). My husband’s go-to name for a pretend person is Chaim Yankel. My son has taken to calling me Ima instead of Mommy because it feels more special to him. All of these together create our own unique family language.

If you’re looking to add a few Jewish words to your family’s lexicon, look no further than this list, featuring my absolute favorite Jewish words.

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Israeli company unveils revolutionary artificial cornea

Israeli-News - 18 hours 1 min ago
By Nicky Blackburn for Israel21c


CorNeat Vision develops new nanotech solution that could one day help restore sight to millions who have gone blind due to diseases of the cornea.


An early-stage Israeli ophthalmic medical devices startup has developed a revolutionary artificial cornea implant that holds out hope to millions of blind and visually impaired people suffering from diseases of the cornea.

The nanotech-based solution by CorNeat Vision of Ra’anana is a synthetic cornea that uses advanced cell technology to integrate artificial optics within ocular tissue.

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My Two Bat Mitzvahs

Interfaith-Issues - 18 hours 1 min ago
By Koca Wen for mashupamericans.com


Coming of age as a Chinese Jew.


When do we become adults? When we experience our first tragedy? When we adopt adult responsibilities, and accept the weight of cultural expectations? When we undertake a coming of age ritual, like a bar mitzvah? For our Chinese-Jewish Mash-Up Koca Wen it was a mash-up of all of the above.

I became an adult girl when I was 12.

Not a woman. An adult girl.

I didn’t have a bat mitzvah. I wasn’t a Jew at that point. I am Chinese, and it was when I began living wholly by the Confucian philosophy and the essential Chinese value of filial piety that I came of age as a Chinese adult. Filial piety, or xiao shun, according to the Chinese, delineates the correct way to behave towards one’s parents. Love them. Be respectful. Polite. Loyal. Helpful. Dutiful. Obedient.

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Lightweight generator on the way for next natural disaster

Green-Living - 18 hours 1 min ago
By Abigail Klein Leichman for Israel21c


Aquarius emergency generator, designed in Israel, weighs only about 100kg but will provide up to 35 kilowatts of power.


Aquarius Engines, the Israeli company that’s working on a revolutionary alternative to the combustion engine for cars, is packaging the same technology into an exceptionally lightweight and efficient portable generator.

It won’t be ready in time to help some 6.5 million Floridians left in the dark by Hurricane Irma, or the Caribbean islands now being hit by Hurricane Maria, but if all goes smoothly the Aquarius generator could be on hardware store shelves ahead of the next wave of massive power losses caused by extreme weather.

Continue reading.

Why I’ve Decided to Join a Synagogue

Young-Adults - 18 hours 1 min ago
BY SOFI HERSHER for ReformJudaism.org


When I was 9 years old, I watched several large sections of my synagogue burn to the ground. It was 1999, and Sacramento, California, was in the midst of a spree of white supremacist violence that would claim the lives of two gay men, and see fires set to several synagogues and a local abortion clinic. I can still smell the smoke.

In times such as these, it is not just buildings that are damaged. Acts of hate damage our minds and our bodies, our individual and collective sense of security, our identity, and our place in the world. Back then, the entire congregation, as well as large swaths of the greater community, came together to rebuild. Events were held to reject discrimination; a hate crimes task force was launched; a library was remade. In many ways, Sacramento became a better place to live than it was before. In the aftermath of destruction, came collaboration and solidarity and hope.

Continue reading.

Guide to the Synagogue Sanctuary, From Ark to Yad

Celebrating-Shabbat - 18 hours 1 min ago
BY RABBI MICHAEL STRASSFELD AND SHARON STRASSFELD for MyJewishLearning.com


An introduction to the parts that make up a synagogue sanctuary.


The Ark

Looking around the synagogue you will see the eastern wall, where the aron ha-kodesh (the holy ark) is located. The ark is the repository for the Torah scrolls when they are not in use. It also serves as the focus for one’s prayers. Above the ark is located the ner tamid–the eternal light — recalling the eternal light in the Temple (Exodus 27:20–21).

Arks can be decorated in innumerable ways and come in many different sizes, shapes, and materials. The central part of the ark is a cabinet that contains the Torah scrolls. This usually has a parochet  — curtain — covering it. (Many Sephardic  shul s do not have a parochet.) The parochet is often elaborately designed with many embellishments; some shuls have a special white parochet used only for the High Holidays. Because the parochet is considered holy, it is treated like any holy object–e.g., books, Torah scrolls, etc.–and is never discarded. [Instead, it is buried when no longer used.]

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Germany celebrates first gay marriages

LGBTQ - 18 hours 1 min ago
By DAVID COURBET for The Times of Israel



First of roughly 94,000 same-sex couples begin exchanging vows, after change of heart by Chancellor Angela Merkel allows measure to pass parliament



Two German men made history Sunday by saying “I do,” and becoming the first same-sex couple to marry after decades of struggle, but campaigners say the battle for equal rights isn’t over.


Wedding bells rang out in Berlin, Hamburg, Hanover and other German cities, where local authorities have exceptionally opened their doors on a Sunday, allowing weddings on the day the law comes into effect.


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British University Put Auschwitz Picture On Cover Of First-Year Welcome Packet

News-in-the-Jewish-World - 18 hours 1 min ago
By Aiden Pink for The Forward


New students at one of Great Britain’s most elite universities were upset after they received a welcome packet that had a picture of the gates of the Auschwitz concentration camp on the cover.

Students at Cambridge University’s Emmanuel College received the packets upon moving in. The packets featured information about a welcome service at the college’s chapel, which included a famous picture of the Auschwitz sign reading “Arbeit Macht Frei”—work will set you free.

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I Survived, and Loved, a Road Trip with My Strictly Religious Sister

Featured-Articles - 18 hours 1 min ago
BY BONNIE MILLER RUBIN for Kveller


It was a dream—and a challenge. Could my two siblings and I–now with full calendars and spread across the country–relive the road trips of our youth that exist only in sepia-toned photos?

After talking about it for years, we finally made it happen in summer 2016: A ten day itinerary, including San Francisco, Carmel and Yosemite National Park. But while we were excited, we also needed to acknowledge that a lot had changed since we last shared the back seat of a Ford station wagon, blissfully content with our Etch-a-Sketch, Archie comic books and a hefty bag of Oreos.

For starters, two of us had spouses, whose interests and physical abilities had to be considered–along with their tolerance for our endless singing of Broadway show tunes. (After our 10th rendition of “You Can’t Get a Man with a Gun,” my husband might be reaching for a weapon of his own).

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Noach - Rosh Chodesh Cheshvan

Weekly-Torah-Portion - 18 hours 1 min ago

Genesis 6:9 - 11:32 


Rabbi Neal Joseph Loevinger for myjewishlearning.com


The Children Of Noah


As the children of Noah, we are challenged to follow his example.


Overview

Creation is not off to such a good start: the earth is filled with violence and corruption, and so God decides to flood the earth and start over, choosing Noah to build an Ark to save himself and his family and at least one pair of every kind of animal. After the flood, God establishes the Rainbow covenant with every living creature. Humans decide to challenge God by building the Tower of Babel, so they become dispersed, and the portion ends by introducing us to Avram and Sarai, who will later on become Abraham and Sarah, the First Family of the Jewish nation.

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Ultimate Simchat Torah Holiday Guide

Jewish-Food - Mon, 10/09/2017 - 12:00am

This article is featured in our Sukkot & Simchat Torah Guide. For more articles, recipes, crafts, and ideas, visit here.
 


From The Joy of Kosher


Help yourself to our Simchat Torah recipes. Click here for the Ultimate Simchat Torah Holiday Guide featuring menus, crafts, tablescapes, gift guides, holiday servingware, kitchen tools and gadgets, entertaining, hosting and cooking tips, tricks and techniques and so much more!

 

Going Into Town: A Love Letter to New York Roz Chast

Jewish-Books - Mon, 10/09/2017 - 12:00am
Review by AJ Frost for Jewish Book Council


Roz Chast’s breezy and winsome jaunt, Going into Town: A Love Letter to New York, prides itself on not being a “definitive guidebook,” nor an “insider’s guide,” nor a “history book.” Rather, it is a deceptively rich rumination of New York as it exists today, an animated investigation into the heart of what makes New York such an indelible beacon of opportunity. In her inimitable cartoon style, so often a highlight in each week’s New Yorker, Chast breaks down what it’s like to live in the Big Apple.

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Isru Chag (the Day After the Festival)

Celebrating-Judaism - Mon, 10/09/2017 - 12:00am
By Naamah Green for Hidabroot


Isru Chag is the day after the three festivals. What is the source for its name, and what customs are kept on this day?


1. Isru Chag is the name of the weekday that follows the three festivals. The Hebrew dates for Isru Chag in Israel are: 23 Tishrei (after Sukkot), 22 Nissan (after Passover) and 7 Sivan (after Shavuot), and outside of Israel, a day later.

2. The source of the name is the verse in Psalms: “Tie the sacrifice (isru chag) with thick ropes to the corners of the altar.” The sages explain “The verse considers one who makes a special meal on this day (thereby “connecting” this day to the previous holiday), as if he built an altar and offered a sacrifice on it.”

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Celebrating Shabbat in Many Ways

Celebrating-Shabbat - Mon, 10/09/2017 - 12:00am
BY ARI GOLDMAN for myjewishlearning.com 


Contemporary Jews have adapted traditional Shabbat practices in non-traditional and sometimes surprising ways.

 

Technically, the laws of Shabbat [can seem] draconian. There are thirty-nine official “don’ts,” and they each have subcategories that add hundreds more. One cannot mow the lawn, hunt for food, light a fire, plant a seed, cook food, boil water, sew on a button, erect a tent, use a hammer, bake a cake, or gather kindling.

Derived from these ancient laws, a host of modern restrictions has been added by scholars, so now it is forbidden [according to Orthodox interpretation of the law] to turn on a computer, drive a car, flick on a light switch, talk on the phone, replace a battery, or watch television. The list is a long one. Conservative rabbis prohibit many of these same activities, but the level of observance among the Conservative laity is not as widespread as it is among the Orthodox. Reform rabbis, for the most part, say that these ancient restrictions are no longer binding, but they increasingly add that if people find meaning in the restrictions, they should incorporate them into their religious lives.

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Israeli government to amend adoption law to give same-sex couples equal rights

LGBTQ - Mon, 10/09/2017 - 12:00am
JTA


The Israeli government said it would amend adoption law in the country to give same-sex couples equal rights.

The state on Sunday made the announcement during a hearing at the Supreme Court in response to a petition regarding adoption by same-sex and common-law couples filed by the Association of Israeli Gay Fathers, with the Israel Religious Action Center of the Reform movement, against the Social Affairs Ministry and the attorney general.

The state said it would introduce the new legislation by June 2018. The agreement comes less than a month after the Ministry of Welfare and Social Affairs reversed its opposition to allowing same-sex couples to adopt in the country. The government had initially told the court that given the “reality of Israeli society,” same-sex parents put an “additional burden” on their adopted children.

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A Photographer Visited 180 New York Shuls

News-in-the-Jewish-World - Mon, 10/09/2017 - 12:00am
BY JONATHAN MARK for The Jewish Week


Angels in the architecture


Davening lends itself to daydreaming, and perhaps your eyes will wander, in these Days of Awe, from windows to ceiling, from carved lions to ornate arks, from stained glass to pews hewn from cedars or acacia. What is a shul supposed to look like, anyway?

In 2015, Michael Weinstein, 54, a financial advisor from Syosset, would often find himself in Brooklyn, where he would volunteer as a visitor to lonely Holocaust survivors. Raised Conservative, but growing more observant, he “sometimes davened in the shuls,” invariably Orthodox, “in these survivor neighborhoods,” such as Borough Park and Flatbush. In shuls, old, elegant and weathered, he felt wonder and spiritual splendor. He felt compelled to photograph them, and then other shuls, in an ever-expanding range of neighborhoods, 60 in all, eventually in all the boroughs. His photos are newly published in “Ten Times Chai: 180 Orthodox Synagogues of New York City” (Brown Books Publishing).

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Origami Torah

Jewish-Children-and-Families - Mon, 10/09/2017 - 12:00am

From JTeach.org


Download the Origami Torah Instructions.
 

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What's Happening at DHJC

 

Mitzvah Day

Sunday Oct 22nd 9:30AM - Noon

More info


Kol Nidre

Kol Nidre Campaign - In addition to making a gift using the Donation Form, you may also make a Pledge to the campaign.

Mail Pledge Form

Online Pledge Form


DHJC Hazak Presents...

Dinner and a Movie

Sunday Oct. 22nd 5PM - 8PM

Cost $15 & includes a Deli Dinner

Questions & RSVP to [email protected]



High Holidays

High Holidays Booklet

For more information


 

Service Times

Normal Service Times - (Except Holidays & Shivas)

Daily Morning Minyan
Monday and Thursday, 6:45am
Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday, 7am
Sunday, 9am

Daily Evening Minyan
Sunday to Thursday, 8pm

Shabbat Services
Friday, 7pm
Saturday, 9:15am

Mincha, Maariv and Havdalah 
Weekly at Sundown
(weekly calendar for exact times)

Save the Date!!

Fall Chai Institute is Coming!!


Calling All United States & Israeli Veterans

Veteran's Appreciation Breakfast - Sun. Nov. 12th

If you are a US Military or Israeli Defense Forces Veteran, or have a family member who is a veteran, please register with the Men's Club so we can recognize you for your service.

Not a veteran? Save the date and come show your support!

Register by sending an email to: [email protected]



DHJC Israel Trip with Rabbi Buechler

Itinerary & Signup form

 

Calendar Updated

Please check our calendar for all our events. 
Early Childhood Center, Religious School & Youth Group & J-Team dates have been posted.


DHJC Collegiate Outreach

DHJC would love to keep in touch with your college student while they are away at school. Sisterhood would like to include your college student in our Collegiate Outreach Program. As a member of DHJC, your undergraduate college student(s) are entitled to receive various mailings and good wishes, all geared to the Jewish lifestyle and calendar.

Please fill out the form and email to Sheryl Gerber or bring to Ellen in the office.

 

Spotlight

Partners in Caring

The PIC Program provides Counseling, Education, Case Management and Volunteer Coordination through the gateways of our synagogue partners

Dix Hills Jewish Center

Huntington Jewish Center

North Shore Jewish Center

Temple Isaiah

Michele Herman, LMSW

PIC Coordinator 631-462-9800x239

[email protected]



Welcome to the Dix Hills Jewish Center

Welcome to the Dix Hills Jewish Center, a Conservative Congregation, celebrating 50 years as a beacon of dynamic Judaism in Dix Hills. We are a traditional egalitarian synagogue committed to the reality that all Jews are full partners in the beauty of Jewish life and that all Jews are given an equal role in all rituals. The Dix Hills Jewish Center is an engaging, vibrant congregation. We are excited about the growth in our synagogue, and the wonderful growth of the Jewish community of Dix Hills, Commack and the neighboring communities. We are a community committed to learning, to supporting each other, and to being a warm and welcoming place for all who participate. Welcome to the Dix Hills Jewish Center.

Service & Minyan times located at the bottom of the page.

If you are interested in attending any of our programs please check the Calendar in Upcoming Events. Children's programming is also available.


In Case Of........

Simchas

For joyous occassions in your life, please share your naches with the Rabbi. Inform the Rabbi about births, engagements, weddings and other noteworthy moments in the life of your family. The Rabbi will arrange for baby namings, provide information regarding a mohel ( for infant boys), coordinate a pidyon ha-ben (the redemption ceremony for firstborn males), schedule an aufruf (to celebrate a forthcoming marriage), weddings and bring the richness of Jewish traditions and mitzvoth into your simcha(email rabbi or call 631-499-6644).

Illness

In case of illness and/or hospitalization, please notify the Rabbi at 631-499-6644 (24/6 - on Shabbat, see below for further emergency instructions)

Death

Even before making funeral arrangements notify Rabbi Buechler at the synagogue office at 631-499-6644 (after office hours press #3 for the emergency numbers). Rabbi Buechler will assist and guide you in making the appropriate arrangements for the funeral. In the event that you cannot reach the Rabbi, contact the Jewish funeral home and begin to make your arrangements. PLEASE, if Rabbi Buechler is going to officiate at the funeral, do not finalize the funeral time until the Rabbi has contacted you. At most this will be a few hours. In the event that Rabbi Buechler is on vacation, Cantor Hevenstone is available and other local Conservative Rabbis are on call. Their names can be obtained by calling the synagogue office, an officer of the synagogue or the Ritual Chairman. It is also appropriate to contact Rabbi Buechler whenever tragedy or trauma occurs. On Shabbat and Yomtov the Rabbi does not use the telephone. Therefore, you can convey information to him on these days at the synagogue during scheduled service times, by calling him immediately after Shabbat or Yomtov or by going to his residence.


Social Action Committee

Bikur Cholim & Home Visits

Do you have a relative or friend in our congregation who would benefit from a personal home visit? We are here for you! Members of our DHJC Social Action Committee - Tender Loving Congregants -- will happily come to visit and chat. BIKUR CHOLIM -- we visit our friends and relatives in Gurwin. Become a volunteer. Learn how.

High School students -- learn how to be a volunteer at Gurwin! There are many ways to volunteer.

Please contact us [email protected]


An Aliyah for YOU

Whether you are 20 or 120, or anything in between, we would like to honor you on the anniversary of your bar or bat mitzvah. Please send the date of your bar/bat mitzvah or the name of your parsha to Lee Grebstein [email protected]


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Latest Edition!!