The Jewish Preview of Books—August 2018

Posted on August 13th, 2018
By Rachel Scheinerman for Jewish Review of Books


Here at the Jewish Review of Books we receive 40-50 books a week. These are some of the books coming out in August that we’re looking forward to reading and—who knows?—maybe reviewing.

 

If book publishing is any measure, this is a good month for the faculty of the Jewish Theological Seminary. JTS professor Jack Wertheimer’s latest contribution, The New American Judaism: How Jews Practice Their Religion Today (Princeton), is due at the end of the month. You can start with Allan Arkush’s discussion in his cover article “In the Melting Pot” from our Summer issue. Wertheimer’s colleague Alan Mittleman’s new book answers the question Does Judaism Condone Violence? Holiness and Ethics in the Jewish Tradition (Princeton). (Does the title give away Mittleman’s answer?)

Continue reading.

My Very Unorthodox Kabbalist

Posted on August 6th, 2018
By Sigal Samuel for Jewish Book Council


To study Kabbalah, you’re supposed to be (a) forty years old, (b) married, and (c) a man. I am none of these things. Luckily, I grew up with a dad who was a professor of Jewish mysticism and was willing to share its secrets with me.
Raised in Montreal’s Orthodox community, I attended a school with strict gender norms. I was expected to obey all of Judaism’s 613 commandments. But, as a girl, I wasn’t allowed to take an interest in the religion’s more esoteric branches.

Continue reading.
 

Torah and the Thermodynamics of Life: An Interview with Jeremy England

Posted on July 30th, 2018
By Rachel Scheinerman for Jewish Review of Books
 

We frequently hear from theologians who reckon with the relationship between religion and science, but it is less common to hear from accomplished scientists on the subject. I spoke with Jeremy England, a research scientist whose work on the origins of life has led some to speculate he might be the next Darwin. This acclaim has resulted in England being described in a recent Dan Brown novel as “the toast of Boston academia, having caused a global stir,” though as England, who is an observant Jew, was quick to point out in The Wall Street Journal Brown misunderstood the implications of his research for religion. I had an opportunity to ask him about his work as a scientist, his Jewish commitment, and how those two reinforce one another.

Continue reading.

Lovesick: Stefan Zweig’s ‘Letter From an Unknown Woman’

Posted on July 23rd, 2018
By Alexander Aciman


Bookworm: The Austrian novelist dissects a broken heart


Dying of flu, a woman sends a letter to the man she has loved all her life—a man who would not know her from a stranger in the street. If he has received this letter, she warns, it means that she has died; otherwise the letter will be torn up. Over the next 70 pages she describes the first time they met, when she was a young girl, then the second time, when she was 18, and finally the third time, years later, when still unable to recognize her, he would pay for an evening of her time as a prostitute. She tells the story of life in the shadow of someone else, of a love from afar, not just unrequited, but unacknowledged, kept secret from the world except for in this letter.

Continue reading.

“In Order that They Didn’t Die Alone”: Remembering Claude Lanzmann

Posted on July 16th, 2018
By Henry Gonshak for Jewish Review of Books


Claude Lanzmann directed what many critics consider the definitive film on the Holocaust, the nine-and-a-half-hour 1985 documentary Shoah. One of the survivors he interviewed, Abraham Bomba, served as a barber while a prisoner at Treblinka. The gruesome job forced on Bomba by the Nazis was to cut the hair of women and girls bound for the gas chambers. (The shorn hair was then used by the Germans in pillows and mattresses.)

Continue reading.

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What's Happening at DHJC

High Holiday Tickets


High Holiday Brochure


Sisterhood Fundraiser


Send the Sweetest of all Rosh Hashana greetings to your family, friends and business associates.
We will ship a personalized package, including a festive 8-ounce jar of Kosher clover honey, a gift card and the blessing for the New Year, anywhere in the United States.
The package will arrive in time for Rosh Hashana.
Ordering is quick and easy online.  Your cost is $12 per jar and a portion of your purchase benefits DHJC Sisterhood.
Click here to order and click on the honey link.
Order online by July 11th to avoid extra shipping fees.
*$5.00 per jar shipping is added to orders after July 11th.
Contact Deborah Firestone if you have any questions.  Thank you for your support!


Service Times

Normal Service Times - (Except Holidays & Shivas)

Daily Morning Minyan
Monday and Thursday, 6:45am
Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday, 7am
Sunday, 9am

Daily Evening Minyan
Sunday to Thursday, 8pm

Shabbat Services
Friday, 7pm
Saturday, 9:15am

Mincha, Maariv and Havdalah 
Weekly at Sundown
(weekly calendar for exact times)

Save the Date!!



 

Calendar Updated

Please check our calendar for all our events. 
Early Childhood Center, Religious School & Youth Group & J-Team dates have been posted.


DHJC Collegiate Outreach

DHJC would love to keep in touch with your college student while they are away at school. Sisterhood would like to include your college student in our Collegiate Outreach Program. As a member of DHJC, your undergraduate college student(s) are entitled to receive various mailings and good wishes, all geared to the Jewish lifestyle and calendar.

Please fill out the form and email to Sheryl Gerber or bring to Ellen in the office.

 

Spotlight

DHJC honored in Albany


The honorable Steve Stern representing our local state assembly district - and a proud DHJC member - honored DHJC in Albany yesterday at the state capitol.

A resolution celebrating the 50th anniversary of DHJC was passed. In addition Rabbi Buechler was honored to offer the invocation at the opening of the assembly session and he was praised during the assembly session by assemblyman Steve Stern.
A stellar and Capitol day for DHJC.
We are proud! Rabbi Buechler's invocation can be viewed at:




Don't Forget To Visit Our Photo Page!

Photos


Partners in Caring

The PIC Program provides Counseling, Education, Case Management and Volunteer Coordination through the gateways of our synagogue partners

Dix Hills Jewish Center

Huntington Jewish Center

North Shore Jewish Center

Temple Isaiah

Michele Herman, LMSW

PIC Coordinator 631-462-9800x239

[email protected]


 

 

Welcome to the Dix Hills Jewish Center

Welcome to the Dix Hills Jewish Center, a Conservative Congregation, celebrating 50 years as a beacon of dynamic Judaism in Dix Hills. We are a traditional egalitarian synagogue committed to the reality that all Jews are full partners in the beauty of Jewish life and that all Jews are given an equal role in all rituals. The Dix Hills Jewish Center is an engaging, vibrant congregation. We are excited about the growth in our synagogue, and the wonderful growth of the Jewish community of Dix Hills, Commack and the neighboring communities. We are a community committed to learning, to supporting each other, and to being a warm and welcoming place for all who participate. Welcome to the Dix Hills Jewish Center.

Service & Minyan times located at the bottom of the page.

If you are interested in attending any of our programs please check the Calendar in Upcoming Events. Children's programming is also available.


In Case Of........

Simchas

For joyous occassions in your life, please share your naches with the Rabbi. Inform the Rabbi about births, engagements, weddings and other noteworthy moments in the life of your family. The Rabbi will arrange for baby namings, provide information regarding a mohel ( for infant boys), coordinate a pidyon ha-ben (the redemption ceremony for firstborn males), schedule an aufruf (to celebrate a forthcoming marriage), weddings and bring the richness of Jewish traditions and mitzvoth into your simcha(email rabbi or call 631-499-6644).

Illness

In case of illness and/or hospitalization, please notify the Rabbi at 631-499-6644 (24/6 - on Shabbat, see below for further emergency instructions)

Death

Even before making funeral arrangements notify Rabbi Buechler at the synagogue office at 631-499-6644 (after office hours press #3 for the emergency numbers). Rabbi Buechler will assist and guide you in making the appropriate arrangements for the funeral. In the event that you cannot reach the Rabbi, contact the Jewish funeral home and begin to make your arrangements. PLEASE, if Rabbi Buechler is going to officiate at the funeral, do not finalize the funeral time until the Rabbi has contacted you. At most this will be a few hours. In the event that Rabbi Buechler is on vacation, Cantor Hevenstone is available and other local Conservative Rabbis are on call. Their names can be obtained by calling the synagogue office, an officer of the synagogue or the Ritual Chairman. It is also appropriate to contact Rabbi Buechler whenever tragedy or trauma occurs. On Shabbat and Yomtov the Rabbi does not use the telephone. Therefore, you can convey information to him on these days at the synagogue during scheduled service times, by calling him immediately after Shabbat or Yomtov or by going to his residence.


Social Action Committee

Bikur Cholim & Home Visits

Do you have a relative or friend in our congregation who would benefit from a personal home visit? We are here for you! Members of our DHJC Social Action Committee - Tender Loving Congregants -- will happily come to visit and chat. BIKUR CHOLIM -- we visit our friends and relatives in Gurwin. Become a volunteer. Learn how.

High School students -- learn how to be a volunteer at Gurwin! There are many ways to volunteer.

Please contact us [email protected]


An Aliyah for YOU

Whether you are 20 or 120, or anything in between, we would like to honor you on the anniversary of your bar or bat mitzvah. Please send the date of your bar/bat mitzvah or the name of your parsha to Lee Grebstein [email protected]


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