Pastries, Filled With History

Posted on July 17th, 2017
By Leah Koenig for Tablet Magazine 


In Seattle’s Sephardic synagogues, women have come together to bake for more than a century. Will a younger generation continue the tradition?


On a recent Monday morning at Congregation Ezra Bessaroth, one of two Sephardic synagogues in Seattle, Rachel Almeleh was up to her elbows in dough. As a volunteer with the synagogue’s ladies auxiliary group she, along with a dozen or so others, had come to bake, as she does almost every week.

With her easy laugh bubbling over the din, Almeleh sat at a folding table covered with parchment-lined baking trays and bowls of mashed potato, spinach, and cheese. She kibbitzed (or more accurately, “echar lashon,” which means chit-chat in Ladino) with the other women, and the occasional man, while rolling, stuffing, and crimping dough into the savory pastries that are central to Sephardic cuisine. “People are always laughing and joking while we bake,” Almeleh said. “There’s a great camaraderie.”

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7 Jewish Foods That Are Surprisingly Healthy

Posted on July 10th, 2017
By Shannon Sarna for The Nosher for myjewishlearning.com 
 

Traditional yet guilt-free.


Jewish food (particularly Ashkenazi) really gets a bad rap as being overwhelmingly fat laden, obesity-inducing dishes lacking fresh fruit and vegetables. But Jewish food is diverse, vibrant and even uses fresh, seasonal vegetables, herbs, colors and spices. Here are a few surprisingly healthy, traditional foods to enjoy with none of the (Jewish) guilt.

1. Traditional tzimmes from Martha Stewart is actually packed with sweet potatoes, carrots and dried fruit — fiber, veggies and fruit all in one sweet, delicious side dish.

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THE BEST BARBECUE RECIPES FOR THE FOURTH OF JULY

Posted on July 3rd, 2017
By Stephanie Butnick for Tablet Magazine 


A kosher BBQ maven’s Texas Dry Rub and Amar’e Stoudemire’s Short Ribs


Independence Day is upon us, and while it’s not a Jewish holiday, it does have a ‘they tried to rule us, we won our independence, let’s eat’ vibe to it. In the spirit of freedom, and grilling—which is, after all, the official fourth of July pastime—here are two of our favorite barbecue recipes from Tablet’s archives.

The first comes from kosher barbecue maven and El Paso native Ari White, who shared his All-Purpose Texas BBQ Dry Rub recipe with Tablet last year. It’s 12-spice rub that combines sweet, savory, and spicy flavors, and can be used on anything from meat to pineapples (there’s video proof).

The second is from New York Knicks power forward Amar’e Stoudemire, a part-owner of Israeli basketball team Hapoel Jerusalem whose interest in Judaism has been well-documented (by us, at least). His new cookbook, new cookbook, Cooking with Amar’e, includes the short rib recipe his family love to serve at their epic Shabbat dinners.
Dayenu.

Read On, Watch Video.

How black food is lighting up the culinary world

Posted on June 26th, 2017
by Jaime Bender for FromtheGrapevine 


When food takes a dark turn, it can really benefit your diet.


What happens when you let garlic ferment for a couple weeks? It turns black. What happens when you burn coconut shells and add the ashes to ice cream? It turns black. And people go crazy for it.

As food trends go, this one's pretty enticing – and rather mysterious. We all know how beneficial it is to eat foods that are green, but what's so great about black food? What happens to food when it turns black that propels it to superfood status?

That depends on the food you're starting with. So we've decided to break down a few of our favorite blackened foods and find out exactly what this black magic is made of.

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Israeli Salad with Chickpeas, Feta & Fresh Mint

Posted on June 19th, 2017
By Shannon Sarna for The Nosher for myjewishlearning.com 


In our home there is a clear division of labor when it comes to the kinds of meals we both cook. The husband is in charge of meat and fish. I am in charge of soups, sauces and salads. (And dessert too of course).

Salads are really so much fun to throw together. I love experimenting with seasonal ingredients I find at my local farmer’s market and also using ingredients I have hanging around in my house. And above all about salads: I love that you can improvise.

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What's Happening at DHJC

 



 

Service Times

Normal Service Times - (Except Holidays & Shivas)

Daily Morning Minyan
Monday and Thursday, 6:45am
Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday, 7am
Sunday, 9am

Daily Evening Minyan
Sunday to Thursday, 8pm

Shabbat Services
Friday, 7pm
Saturday, 9:15am

Mincha, Maariv and Havdalah 
Weekly at Sundown
(weekly calendar for exact times)

Save the Date!!

Reservation Form


 

 

 

Calendar Updated

Please check our calendar for all our events. 
Early Childhood Center, Religious School & Youth Group & J-Team dates have been posted.


Rabbi's Summer Class Schedule 2017

See all the activities scheduled!!

DHJC Collegiate Outreach

DHJC would love to keep in touch with your college student while they are away at school. Sisterhood would like to include your college student in our Collegiate Outreach Program. As a member of DHJC, your undergraduate college student(s) are entitled to receive various mailings and good wishes, all geared to the Jewish lifestyle and calendar.

Please fill out the form and email to Sharon Nachman or bring to Ellen in the office.

 

Welcome to the Dix Hills Jewish Center

Welcome to the Dix Hills Jewish Center, a Conservative Congregation, celebrating 49 years as a beacon of dynamic Judaism in Dix Hills. We are a traditional egalitarian synagogue committed to the reality that all Jews are full partners in the beauty of Jewish life and that all Jews are given an equal role in all rituals. The Dix Hills Jewish Center is an engaging, vibrant congregation. We are excited about the growth in our synagogue, and the wonderful growth of the Jewish community of Dix Hills, Commack and the neighboring communities. We are a community committed to learning, to supporting each other, and to being a warm and welcoming place for all who participate. Welcome to the Dix Hills Jewish Center.

Service & Minyan times located at the bottom of the page.

If you are interested in attending any of our programs please check the Calendar in Upcoming Events. Children's programming is also available.


In Case Of........

Simchas

For joyous occassions in your life, please share your naches with the Rabbi. Inform the Rabbi about births, engagements, weddings and other noteworthy moments in the life of your family. The Rabbi will arrange for baby namings, provide information regarding a mohel ( for infant boys), coordinate a pidyon ha-ben (the redemption ceremony for firstborn males), schedule an aufruf (to celebrate a forthcoming marriage), weddings and bring the richness of Jewish traditions and mitzvoth into your simcha(email rabbi or call 631-499-6644).

Illness

In case of illness and/or hospitalization, please notify the Rabbi at 631-499-6644 (24/6 - on Shabbat, see below for further emergency instructions)

Death

Even before making funeral arrangements notify Rabbi Buechler at the synagogue office at 631-499-6644 (after office hours press #3 for the emergency numbers). Rabbi Buechler will assist and guide you in making the appropriate arrangements for the funeral. In the event that you cannot reach the Rabbi, contact the Jewish funeral home and begin to make your arrangements. PLEASE, if Rabbi Buechler is going to officiate at the funeral, do not finalize the funeral time until the Rabbi has contacted you. At most this will be a few hours. In the event that Rabbi Buechler is on vacation, Cantor Hevenstone is available and other local Conservative Rabbis are on call. Their names can be obtained by calling the synagogue office, an officer of the synagogue or the Ritual Chairman. It is also appropriate to contact Rabbi Buechler whenever tragedy or trauma occurs. On Shabbat and Yomtov the Rabbi does not use the telephone. Therefore, you can convey information to him on these days at the synagogue during scheduled service times, by calling him immediately after Shabbat or Yomtov or by going to his residence.


Social Action Committee

Bikur Cholim & Home Visits

Do you have a relative or friend in our congregation who would benefit from a personal home visit? We are here for you! Members of our DHJC Social Action Committee - Tender Loving Congregants -- will happily come to visit and chat. BIKUR CHOLIM -- we visit our friends and relatives in Gurwin. Become a volunteer. Learn how.

High School students -- learn how to be a volunteer at Gurwin! There are many ways to volunteer.

Please contact us [email protected]


 

An Aliyah for YOU

Whether you are 20 or 120, or anything in between, we would like to honor you on the anniversary of your bar or bat mitzvah. Please send the date of your bar/bat mitzvah or the name of your parsha to Lee Grebstein [email protected]


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