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Shabbat Shuva - Ha’azinu

Weekly-Torah-Portion - Mon, 09/18/2017 - 9:15am

Deuteronomy 32:1-32:52 


Adam Rosenthal received rabbinic ordination from the Jewish Theological Seminary in May of 2007 and is now serving as rabbi of Peninsula Sinai Congregation in Foster City, California. 


Remember the Days of Old


The Torah describes an earlier time, when lands were distributed fairly by God.


Among the major contributors to suffering around the world is the inequitable distribution of land and resources. The richest 2% of adults in the world own more than half of global household wealth. On a more concrete level, in El Salvador, where I volunteered for 10 days on the AJWS Rabbinical Students’ Delegation, though the land was nominally redistributed in 1992, it was done far from equitably: The poorest people got the lowlands, which are prone to flooding, while the wealthiest held the fertile country, perpetuating the country’s economic inequalities.

In Parashat Ha’Azinu, the Torah poetically describes an earlier time, when lands were apportioned by God to each nation:

Continue reading.

Sweet Kugel Makes for a Sweet New Year

Jewish-Food - Mon, 09/18/2017 - 12:00am

 

This month we are featuring recipes from our High Holiday Guide. For more articles, recipes, crafts, and ideas, visit here. 


By LAURA for Mother Would Know


Kugel is the kind of dish that lends itself to endless variations and numerous occasions. A pudding, savory or sweet, it is traditionally served on the Sabbath and for meals during the Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur holidays.

But in my family, it’s also a favored dish for weekdays from early fall, right through to the beginning of summer. In fact, my kids used to eat sweet kugel at least once a week and more often if I didn’t groan when they requested it yet again.

Continue reading.

Five Books That Counter the “Negative” Narrative of Jewish Literature

Jewish-Books - Mon, 09/18/2017 - 12:00am
Devorah Baum for Jewish Book Council
 
 

Grace Paley – Collected Stories


Everyone should read Grace Paley. She deals with tough stuff with wit, vitality and grace and she tempers what many would consider tragic storylines with an insistence that where there is life there can always be ‘enormous changes at the last minute’. Unlike the dominant male voices in American Jewish letters, who’ve tended to resist the labeling of either themselves or their fictions as Jewish, Grace Paley showed no such commitment phobia: “I like being Jewish” she once – shockingly – said.


Hélène Cixous – Reveries of the Wild Woman, Primal Scenes


Continue reading.

Rosh Hashanah FAQ: All About the Jewish New Year

Celebrating-Judaism - Mon, 09/18/2017 - 12:00am
BY MJL STAFF


What is Rosh Hashanah about exactly?


Rosh Hashanah (the Jewish New Year) is simultaneously a time of great celebration and subtle trepidation. It is a day to celebrate our creation, but also a day of accounting and judgment for our actions. On Rosh Hashanah, we relate to God as the Ultimate Judge. The Book of Life is opened before the Divine Being and we become advocates for our personal inscription into this book. We review the choices we have made over the past year, our actions and our intentions, as we attempt to honestly evaluate ourselves. You may want to consult this list of questions to help in your introspection.


What is a shofar?

 

Continue reading.

For more articles, recipes, crafts, and ideas, visit here. 

Make a Shofar to Celebrate the Jewish New Year

Jewish-Children-and-Families - Mon, 09/18/2017 - 12:00am
This article is featured in our High Holiday Guide. For more articles, recipes, crafts, and ideas, visit here

BY CINDY HOPPER for AlphaMom


Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, begins at sundown on Friday, September 18th and lasts through Sunday, September 20th.  During Rosh Hashanah a Shofar, traditionally made from a hollowed out rams horn, is blown to awake and inspire.  The Shofar is such an important part of this holiday that sometimes Rosh Hashanah is called Yom Teruah, which means “day of the Shofar blast” in Hebrew.

With a few supplies you can make your own Shofar horn. Gather 3 toilet paper rolls per horn, a party horn, masking tape, glue, paint brush, scissors and white and brown paint.

Continue reading.

Restaurants okayed to say food kosher without rabbinate’s approval

Israeli-News - Mon, 09/18/2017 - 12:00am
Times of Israel Staff



Landmark High Court ruling finds informing consumers about food's origins cannot be prohibited, denting monopoly by ultra-Orthodox-controlled state rabbinical body



The High Court of Justice on Tuesday ruled that Israeli restaurateurs are permitted to inform their clientele that they serve kosher food even if they do not have kashrut certification from the Israeli state rabbinate.
The Law Prohibiting Fraud in Kashrut states that “the owner of a food establishment may not present the establishment as kosher unless it was given a certificate of kashrut,” and that only official state or local rabbis may give such certificates.


Continue reading.
 

Rosh Hashanah Blessings

Interfaith-Issues - Mon, 09/18/2017 - 12:00am
This article has been reprinted with permission from InterfaithFamily 

For more great information, visit our High Holiday Guide. 


For those looking for a quick, easy reference to guide them through the home Rosh Hashanah ritual blessings, this resource is for you!

Our handy Rosh Hashanah Blessings, in an easy-to-print PDF format, includes the customary prayers said before the erev Rosh Hashanah (first evening of Rosh Hashanah) meal, all in Hebrew and transliteration, with traditional and alternative translations as well.

Not sure how to pronounce the Hebrew? Read along, in transliteration or in Hebrew, and listen to each blessing:

Continue to listen.

You've never seen fruit this color before

Green-Living - Mon, 09/18/2017 - 12:00am
by Jaime Bender for FromtheGrapevine 


Pigments made from beets can enhance not only the color of your produce, but the nutritional value, too.


What can beets do for you? We already know they're packed with health benefits and make a great addition to lots of dishes, like salads, juices and hummus.

But did you know they can also make other foods healthier?

Researchers at the Weizmann Institute in Israel recently discovered that fruits and vegetables can be genetically engineered to produce betalains, the same pigments that give beets their vibrant red color. Potatoes, tomatoes and eggplants can be altered to give off a whole variety of colors without changing the look of the plants they grow on.

Continue reading.

What Jewish College Students Really Care About

Young-Adults - Mon, 09/18/2017 - 12:00am
BY SARA WEISSMAN for The Jewish Week


Lesson 1: Jewish students don’t exist in a vacuum — or in a separate realm on campus comprised solely of Hillel BBQs and BDS protests.


"What do Jewish millennials want to read?”

“What’s going on in the minds of future Jewry?” 

As the editor of New Voices, a national online magazine written by and for Jewish college students, I field these questions constantly — at conferences, Shabbat tables, blind dates and board meetings.

Thankfully, New Voices has always had a simple answer. And per Jewish tradition, our answer is actually another question: “What do Jewish millennials want to write?” 

Continue reading.

Shabbat Shuva - Ha’azinu

Weekly-Torah-Portion - Mon, 09/18/2017 - 12:00am

Deuteronomy 32:1-32:52 


Adam Rosenthal received rabbinic ordination from the Jewish Theological Seminary in May of 2007 and is now serving as rabbi of Peninsula Sinai Congregation in Foster City, California. 


Remember the Days of Old


The Torah describes an earlier time, when lands were distributed fairly by God.


Among the major contributors to suffering around the world is the inequitable distribution of land and resources. The richest 2% of adults in the world own more than half of global household wealth. On a more concrete level, in El Salvador, where I volunteered for 10 days on the AJWS Rabbinical Students’ Delegation, though the land was nominally redistributed in 1992, it was done far from equitably: The poorest people got the lowlands, which are prone to flooding, while the wealthiest held the fertile country, perpetuating the country’s economic inequalities.

In Parashat Ha’Azinu, the Torah poetically describes an earlier time, when lands were apportioned by God to each nation:

Continue reading.

What Is Shabbat Shuvah?

Celebrating-Shabbat - Mon, 09/18/2017 - 12:00am
BY MJL STAFF


Shabbat Shuvah is celebrated this year on September 23


The Sabbath between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur emphasizes themes of return and repentance.


The Shabbat that falls during the week between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur is called Shabbat Shuvah, or the Sabbath of Return, but Shabbat Shuvah is also a pun. Shuvah, sounds very much like teshuva, or repentance, another core concept of the High Holidays.

With Yom Kippur , and the Book of Life foremost on everyone’s minds, the services this Shabbat and the atmosphere are solemn and focused. The Haftarah portion is made up of selections from two books of Prophets — Hosea, and either Micah or Joel, depending on whether the community is Sephardic or Ashkenazi. Ashkenazi Jews read Hosea 14:2-10 and Joel 2:15-27. Sephardim read Hosea 14:2-10 and Micah 7:18-20. The selection from Hosea focuses on a universal call for repentance, and an assurance that those who return to God will benefit from Divine healing and restoration. The selection from Joel imagines a blow of the shofar that will unite the people for fasting and supplication. Hosea focuses on Divine forgiveness, and how great it is in comparison to the forgiveness of man. Other than the special Haftarah, the service on Shabbat Shuvah is not any different from a regular Shabbat service.

Continue reading.

I’m a Queer Jew Living in Germany. I feel Safer Here Than in the US

LGBTQ - Mon, 09/18/2017 - 12:00am
By Sara Shafer for HeyAlma

 

After I moved to Germany in March 2015, friends on both sides of the pond asked me if I was scared of my new home.

Scared? Why should I be scared? Oh, right. Because I’m Jewish and, as one of my former students put it, “pur-tay queer.” Yes, there are neo-Nazis in Germany, but they don’t have enough political power to be a problem, and they seem to do a good job of making themselves appear silly. I’m also a big girl. I stand 6’1’’ and am a heavily tattooed and pierced former competitive weightlifter. So, while being Jewish and a gender non-conformist would have been two strikes against me during the Holocaust, I don’t think I am going to be the first person the skinheads in Germany would mess with in 2017.

Continue reading.

15,000 people attended largest Israeli Cultural Festival in Europe

News-in-the-Jewish-World - Mon, 09/18/2017 - 12:00am

eJewishPhilanthropy
 
 

The largest Israeli cultural event in Europe, TLVinLDN, attracted some 15,000 people to the five-day event to celebrate Israeli culture and diversity in London.


The festival, hosted Sept. 7 – 11, was organized under the direction of TLVinLDN Chairman Marc Worth, and realized with the support and partnership of Israel’s Ministry of Strategic Affairs and Public Diplomacy, as well as other sponsors and private donors.


Some of Israel’s top female singers, including Ethiopian-Israeli Ester Rada, performed for hundreds of locals during Sunday’s celebration, under the theme “Woman in Power,” at the historic Roundhouse Music Hall in London.
“We came from Tel Aviv to bring you love,” said Rada, as she opened the evening before a soul music performance from Maximilian Blumin.


Continue reading.
 

May You Be Inscribed for a Good Laugh

Featured-Articles - Mon, 09/18/2017 - 12:00am
MEIR Y. SOLOVEICHIK for Commentary


Laughter,” writes the the essayist Jim Holt in his book Stop Me If You’ve Heard This, “is our characteristic response to the aesthetic category of the humorous, the comical, or the funny. What is it about the humorous situation that evokes this response? Why should a certain kind of cerebral activity issue in such a peculiar behavioral reflex?”

This is not only a question that is raised every time you watch the Marx Brothers; it is also, you will be surprised to hear, at the very heart of Judaism. Laughter is a central theme on one of Judaism’s most serious days, a fact that makes it clear that for Jews, laughter is no laughing matter.

On Rosh Hashanah, the Day of Awe that begins each new year, we read the passage in the Torah about the miraculous birth of a son to the elderly Sarah, then 90 years of age. This son’s Hebrew name, Yitzchak, means “he will laugh.” This, the Bible informs us, is linked to the laughter that his birth to Sarah provoked: “And the Lord visited Sarah as he had said, and the Lord did unto Sarah as he had spoken. For Sarah conceived, and bore Abraham a son in his old age . . . . And Abraham was a hundred years old, when his son Isaac was born unto him. And Sarah said, God hath made me to laugh, so that all that hear will laugh with me.”

Continue reading.

Pomegranate and Honey Glazed Chicken

Jewish-Food - Mon, 09/11/2017 - 12:00am

 

This month we are featuring recipes from our High Holiday Guide. For more articles, recipes, crafts, and ideas, visit here. 


BY LIZ RUEVEN for The Nosher for myjewishlearning.com 

Pomegranates, or rimonim in Hebrew, are one of the most recognizable and highly symbolic fruits in Jewish culture.


Pomegranates, or rimonim in Hebrew, are one of the most recognizable and highly symbolic fruits in Jewish culture. Originating in Persia, these reddish, thick skinned fruit (technically a berry) begin to appear in markets at end of summer and are readily available for holiday cooking by Rosh Hashanah.

According to Gil Marks in The Encyclopedia of Jewish Food, the abundance of seeds, nestled into a white membrane and encased in a protective and leathery skin, is associated with the 613 commandments in the Torah. They serve as symbols of righteousness and fruitfulness as expressed in the Rosh Hashanah expression, “May we be full of merits like the pomegranate (is full of seeds).”

Continue reading.

Jews vs Aliens (Volume 1)

Jewish-Books - Mon, 09/11/2017 - 12:00am
Review by Inger Saphire-Bernstein for Jewish Book Council


Two companion collections of short stories edited by Lavie Tidhar and Rebecca Levene explore interactions or collisions between Jews and aliens and Jews and zombies, respectively. The editors invited accomplished science fiction writers to submit new stories related to the open-ended themes. Inclusion of Jews (or Judaism), aliens and/or zombies were the only expectations. As a result, the stories vary widely in subject matter, accessibility, and tone.

Continue reading.

Tashlich, the Symbolic Casting Off of Sins

Celebrating-Judaism - Mon, 09/11/2017 - 12:00am

This article is featured in our High Holiday Guide. For more articles, recipes, crafts, and ideas, visit here. 


BY LESLI KOPPELMAN ROSS for myjewishlearning.com 


A Rosh Hashanah ritual for the whole family.


What Is Tashlich?

On the first day of Rosh Hashanah , before sunset, Jews traditionally proceed to a body of running water, preferably one containing fish, and symbolically cast off (tashlich) their sins. The ceremony includes reading the source passage for the practice, the last verses from the prophet Micah (7:19), “He will take us back in love; He will cover up our iniquities. You will cast all their sins into the depths of the sea.”

Selections from Psalms, particularly 118 and 130, along with supplications and a kabbalistic prayer hoping God will treat Israel with mercy, are parts of tashlich in various communities.

Continue reading.

Apple Cloud Dough

Jewish-Children-and-Families - Mon, 09/11/2017 - 12:00am

This project is featured in our High Holiday Guide. For more articles, recipes, crafts, and ideas, visit here


From Growing A Jeweled Rose


Cloud dough is such a fun sensory material, and it is so incredibly easy to make.  It is safe for kids of all ages too, which is always a bonus.  Today, we made a new batch of cloud dough perfect for Fall. 

And for the High Holidays.

Apple Cloud Dough Recipe
7 cups of flour
1 cup of vegetable oil 
Apple Pie Spice and/or cinnamon

Method
Combine the ingredients in a sensory bin or container and mix well.  That's it!  Couldn't be easier, right? 

Continue reading.

High Holiday Resources from Our Friends at jkidphilly

Jewish-Children-and-Families - Mon, 09/11/2017 - 12:00am

This article is featured in our High Holiday Guide. For more articles, recipes, crafts, and ideas, visit here


Rosh Hashanah occurs on the first and second days of the Jewish month of Tishri. In Hebrew, Rosh Hashanah means, literally, "head of the year" or "first of the year." Rosh Hashanah is commonly known as the Jewish New Year. The celebration of this holiday is marked with both joy and solemnity, as it is the day on which the whole world is judged for the coming year.  Rosh Hashanah is the birthday of the world, as it was on this day that God created man on the 6th day of creation.

Print, color and mail Rosh Hashanah postcards to your family and friends!
Download and print our Rosh Hashanah info sheet
Rosh Hashanah Hannah and her friends on Shalom Sesame rock out the New Year on this video clip.
G-dcast presents Shofar Callin': The Rosh Hashanah Song  

Continue reading.

Was the oldest mug shop in history just discovered?

Israeli-News - Mon, 09/11/2017 - 12:00am
by Benyamin Cohen for FromtheGrapevine 


Archaeologists have found a chalkstone vessel workshop that dates back thousands of years.


You saunter into your office break room for a cup of joe and scan the room for a usable mug. There, far in the corner, is the "World's Best Dad" cup that some co-worker left there months ago – so long, in fact, that nobody can quite remember who it belongs to. Nonetheless, it sits in the corner collecting dust. You think that mug is old? Think again.

A team of archaeologists in Israel has just discovered the remains of a rare mug workshop in the northern part of the country. It's believed to be thousands of years old. The dig site was full of chalkstone vessels – mostly mugs and bowls – that were in various stages of production.

Continue reading.

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Order by Sept 29th by calling the synagogue office 631-499-6644


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Service Times

Normal Service Times - (Except Holidays & Shivas)

Daily Morning Minyan
Monday and Thursday, 6:45am
Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday, 7am
Sunday, 9am

Daily Evening Minyan
Sunday to Thursday, 8pm

Shabbat Services
Friday, 7pm
Saturday, 9:15am

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Please check our calendar for all our events. 
Early Childhood Center, Religious School & Youth Group & J-Team dates have been posted.


DHJC Collegiate Outreach

DHJC would love to keep in touch with your college student while they are away at school. Sisterhood would like to include your college student in our Collegiate Outreach Program. As a member of DHJC, your undergraduate college student(s) are entitled to receive various mailings and good wishes, all geared to the Jewish lifestyle and calendar.

Please fill out the form and email to Sheryl Gerber or bring to Ellen in the office.

 

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Partners in Caring

The PIC Program provides Counseling, Education, Case Management and Volunteer Coordination through the gateways of our synagogue partners

Dix Hills Jewish Center

Huntington Jewish Center

North Shore Jewish Center

Temple Isaiah

Michele Herman, LMSW

PIC Coordinator 631-462-9800x239

[email protected]


Welcome to the Dix Hills Jewish Center

Welcome to the Dix Hills Jewish Center, a Conservative Congregation, celebrating 50 years as a beacon of dynamic Judaism in Dix Hills. We are a traditional egalitarian synagogue committed to the reality that all Jews are full partners in the beauty of Jewish life and that all Jews are given an equal role in all rituals. The Dix Hills Jewish Center is an engaging, vibrant congregation. We are excited about the growth in our synagogue, and the wonderful growth of the Jewish community of Dix Hills, Commack and the neighboring communities. We are a community committed to learning, to supporting each other, and to being a warm and welcoming place for all who participate. Welcome to the Dix Hills Jewish Center.

Service & Minyan times located at the bottom of the page.

If you are interested in attending any of our programs please check the Calendar in Upcoming Events. Children's programming is also available.


In Case Of........

Simchas

For joyous occassions in your life, please share your naches with the Rabbi. Inform the Rabbi about births, engagements, weddings and other noteworthy moments in the life of your family. The Rabbi will arrange for baby namings, provide information regarding a mohel ( for infant boys), coordinate a pidyon ha-ben (the redemption ceremony for firstborn males), schedule an aufruf (to celebrate a forthcoming marriage), weddings and bring the richness of Jewish traditions and mitzvoth into your simcha(email rabbi or call 631-499-6644).

Illness

In case of illness and/or hospitalization, please notify the Rabbi at 631-499-6644 (24/6 - on Shabbat, see below for further emergency instructions)

Death

Even before making funeral arrangements notify Rabbi Buechler at the synagogue office at 631-499-6644 (after office hours press #3 for the emergency numbers). Rabbi Buechler will assist and guide you in making the appropriate arrangements for the funeral. In the event that you cannot reach the Rabbi, contact the Jewish funeral home and begin to make your arrangements. PLEASE, if Rabbi Buechler is going to officiate at the funeral, do not finalize the funeral time until the Rabbi has contacted you. At most this will be a few hours. In the event that Rabbi Buechler is on vacation, Cantor Hevenstone is available and other local Conservative Rabbis are on call. Their names can be obtained by calling the synagogue office, an officer of the synagogue or the Ritual Chairman. It is also appropriate to contact Rabbi Buechler whenever tragedy or trauma occurs. On Shabbat and Yomtov the Rabbi does not use the telephone. Therefore, you can convey information to him on these days at the synagogue during scheduled service times, by calling him immediately after Shabbat or Yomtov or by going to his residence.


Social Action Committee

Bikur Cholim & Home Visits

Do you have a relative or friend in our congregation who would benefit from a personal home visit? We are here for you! Members of our DHJC Social Action Committee - Tender Loving Congregants -- will happily come to visit and chat. BIKUR CHOLIM -- we visit our friends and relatives in Gurwin. Become a volunteer. Learn how.

High School students -- learn how to be a volunteer at Gurwin! There are many ways to volunteer.

Please contact us [email protected]


An Aliyah for YOU

Whether you are 20 or 120, or anything in between, we would like to honor you on the anniversary of your bar or bat mitzvah. Please send the date of your bar/bat mitzvah or the name of your parsha to Lee Grebstein [email protected]


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